A driving course around the underground resources in Amakusa

 

  • Eboshi Pithead of the Ushibuka coal mineEboshi Pithead of the Ushibuka coal mine
  • Amakusa Shimoda hot springAmakusa Shimoda hot spring


Course Map


Course Map

Model Course

1. Eboshi Pithead of the Ushibuka coal mine The Eboshi pithead is a part of the Ushibuka coal mine where operation started in Meiji 30 (1897) and continued for several years, but now sits in ruins symbolizing the downfall of the high quality coal industry as an energy source of Japan in that era in the Amakusa area.
2. Ruins of the Oniki coal mine The Oniki area had a large coal mine in the Amakusa area, in operation from the beginning of the Meiji era to the 48th year of Showa(1973). Some remains of the coal mine are found throughout the Oniki area.
3. Outcrop of Amakusa pottery stone At Uchida-sarayama in Reihoku town, there is an outcrops of Amakusa pottery stone. “Amakusa pottery stone” is a product derived from intrusive rhyolite. The rhyolite was brought to the western area of Amakusa-shimoshima by volcanic activity in the Miocene.
4. Shiki coal mine monument pedestal In the Amakusa area, coal mine production continued from the middle of the Meiji period to 1975. The only railway in the Amakusa area operated from the mine to the harbor with the purpose of moving coal to waiting barges. The “Shiki coal mine monument pedestal” is a pedestal of the safe prayer bell that once sat at the Hisatsune entrance gate of the Shiki coal mine.
5. Amakusa Shimoda hot spring According to legend, the hot spring called ‘Shirasagi hot spring’ began gushing out from a riverside where an egret (heron) was nursing its wound. The present source of the hot spring is at a depth of 250 m, with an acidity of PH7.84”, containing sodium hydrogen-carbonate and chloride with a temperature of 51.3 degrees.