Stone culture and dolphin watching in Amakusa

 

  • Gion BridgeGion Bridge
  • Dolphin watchingDolphin watching


Course Map


Course Map

Model Course

1. Tanasoko Castle, stone walls and ‘Koguri’ Tanasoko Castle serves as a naturally designated cultural asset as one of the ‘Yamajiro’ which symbolizes the medieval times of the Amakusa area. Stone walls which enclose the houses are mainly constructed of andesite stone from Mt. Kuratake, creating this peculiar cultural landscape. A waterway called ‘Koguri’ leads the subterranean water to ‘tanada’ on the Tanasoko fan.
2. An outcrop of the Shimoura Stone The Toishi Formation of the Paleogene, mainly composed of sandstone, is distributed in the Shimoura area and is named ‘Shimoura Stone.’ The sandstone seen by this outcrop was quarried and used for the construction of stone bridges distributed throughout the Amakusa islands that have become officially designated cultural assets.
3. Gion Bridge The Gion Bridge, a national important cultural property, was constructed in 1832. This rare multi-leg bridge supported by 45 stone pillars with a span of 28.6 m in length and a width of 3.3m was constructed of sandstone (called Shimoura-ishi) from the Toishi Formation mined from the Shimoura area in Amakusa-kamishima and is very rare throughout Japan.
4. Semui-bashi of Yamaguchi The Semui-bashi of Yamaguchi in Hondo area is a single arch bridge with a thin bridge wall spanning 22.73m in length and 3.24m in width. This stone bridge constructed in 1882 of Shimoura-ishi is a Kumamoto designated cultural asset.
5. Dolphin watching There is a high probability of observing Indo-Pacific bottlenose dolphins of which about 200 live in the Hayasaki strait between Amakusa-shimoshima and the Shimabara peninsula . Dolphin watching adventures allow participants to catch a glimpse of the strait and its ecosystem.